Office of Research & Grant Development

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The Office of Research and Grant Development is here to assist your research needs by:

  • Announcing funding opportunities
  • Reviewing guidelines and discuss best approaches
  • Working with the PI and the Dean’s office on budgets and indirect costs
  • Being a liaison to foundations, program officers, and other outside agencies
  • Facilitating collaboration with other departments, colleges and CWRU central support offices.
  • Assisting with the development of research proposals (budget, editing, administrative forms, and compilation)
  • Providing guidance with post-award compliance and progress reports.
  • Conducting funding searches for special projects.

 

 

 

FACULTY NEWS & RESEARCH

Seven out of Nine CAS Faculty Win ACES+ 2017 Opportunity Awards

Date posted: March 27th, 2017

ACES+, the continuation of the Academic Careers in Engineering & Science (ACES) program, announced the recipients of the 2017 ADVANCE Opportunity Grant Awards.
Nine proposals representing academic disciplines–ranging from nursing to engineering to psychological sciences–have been awarded a total of $31,510. …Read more.

Professor John Protasiewicz Receives Mandel Award for Outstanding Chemistry Faculty

Date posted: March 27th, 2017

For John Protasiewicz, going green is about more than sustainability. It signals a supportive, more collaborative approach—something altogether different from the high-stress, pressure-cooker environment evoked by bright red. It represents one of many reasons why Protasiewicz won the Mandel Award for Outstanding Chemistry Faculty this year.  …Read more.

Cassi Pittman awarded Career Enhancement Fellow

Date posted: March 27th, 2017

 
 
Cassi Pittman, associate professor of sociology, has been awarded a Career Enhancement Fellow by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, which administers funds for the program provided by the Andrew W. …Read more.

Michael Hinczewski, Assistant Professor in Physics, One of Three NSF CAREER Award Winners

Date posted: March 27th, 2017

Three Case Western Reserve University junior faculty members have received National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) grants, totaling nearly $1.7 million.
The five-year grants support research into:

Movements of nanoparticles through confined spaces, with applications to food source security and water purification;

The formation and regulation of protein bonds between cells; and

A deep look into the physics and variables in 3-D printing processes of metal parts. …Read more.

Dr. Stacy McGaugh, Chair, Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University Appears on NPR to Discuss Dark Matter

Date posted: March 22nd, 2017

 
You probably have heard of Dark Matter, that unknown substance that makes up most of the universe? But what if Dark Matter isn’t real? Or what if it’s based on wrong physics? …Read more.

Political Science’s Karen Beckwith Wins Grant for Upcoming Book

Date posted: March 22nd, 2017

Posted on March 10, 2017

The American Political Science Association (APSA) has awarded a Centennial Center for Political Science and Public Affairs grant to Karen Beckwith, the Flora Stone Mather Professor and chair of the Department of Political Science. …Read more.

Two Art History Faculty Win Prestigious NEH Fellowships

Date posted: December 20th, 2016

 
Odds are long for any application for a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) fellowship—only about 7 percent are awarded. Even longer are the odds that two professors from the same department each receive one of the prestigious grants in the same year. …Read more.

Malaria detection device faster, more accurate than current methods

Date posted: November 4th, 2016

 
A Case Western Reserve team from international health and physics has won national recognition for a portable malaria detection device with the potential to transform diagnosis and treatment of the disease in developing countries. …Read more.

Emmitt Jolly Lab Featured in Science Daily for New Publication

Date posted: October 5th, 2016

Heat Shock Protein Appears to Turn on Schistosoma Invasion
A protein known for helping cells withstand stress may also act as a switch that triggers free-swimming Schistosoma larvae to begin penetrating the skin and transforming into the parasitic flatworms that burden more than 240 million people worldwide with schistosomiasis. …Read more.

Astronomy Chair Stacy McGaugh, Lead Author of Paper Accepted for Publication by the Journal Physics Review Letters, Selected as Editor’s Choice to be Featured on Website arXiv

Date posted: October 5th, 2016

Astronomy Chair Stacy McGaugh, Lead Author of Paper Accepted for Publication by the Journal Physics Review Letters, Selected as Editor’s Choice to be Featured on Website arXiv
 
Posted on September 21, 2016

IN ROTATING GALAXIES, DISTRIBUTION OF NORMAL MATTER PRECISELY DETERMINES GRAVITATIONAL ACCELERATION 
 
A new radial acceleration relation found among spiral and irregular galaxies challenges current understanding – and possibly existence – of dark matter
Newswise — In the late 1970s, astronomers Vera Rubin and Albert Bosma independently found that spiral galaxies rotate at a nearly constant speed: the velocity of stars and gas inside a galaxy does not decrease with radius, as one would expect from Newton’s laws and the distribution of visible matter, but remains approximately constant. …Read more.

In the Media

Dr. Stacy McGaugh, Chair, Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University Appears on NPR to Discuss Dark Matter

You probably have heard of Dark Matter, that unknown substance that makes up most of the universe? But what if Dark Matter isn’t real? Or what if it’s based on wrong physics? On March 13, 2017 McGaugh joined the Science Cafe Edition of The Sound of Ideas explaining why understanding Dark Matter matters. McGaugh also presented that evening at Music Box Super Club as part of Science Cafe about Dark Matter or Modified Gravity? What the Acceleration Scale in Galaxies Suggests. To see the NPR talk visit here.

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Page last modified: March 27, 2017