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Home / News / Astronomy Chair Stacy McGaugh, Lead Author of Paper Accepted for Publication by the Journal Physics Review Letters, Selected as Editor’s Choice to be Featured on Website arXiv

Astronomy Chair Stacy McGaugh, Lead Author of Paper Accepted for Publication by the Journal Physics Review Letters, Selected as Editor’s Choice to be Featured on Website arXiv

Posted on October 5, 2016

Astronomy Chair Stacy McGaugh, Lead Author of Paper Accepted for Publication by the Journal Physics Review Letters, Selected as Editor’s Choice to be Featured on Website arXiv

 

Posted on September 21, 2016

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IN ROTATING GALAXIES, DISTRIBUTION OF NORMAL MATTER PRECISELY DETERMINES GRAVITATIONAL ACCELERATION 

 

A new radial acceleration relation found among spiral and irregular galaxies challenges current understanding – and possibly existence – of dark matter

Newswise — In the late 1970s, astronomers Vera Rubin and Albert Bosma independently found that spiral galaxies rotate at a nearly constant speed: the velocity of stars and gas inside a galaxy does not decrease with radius, as one would expect from Newton’s laws and the distribution of visible matter, but remains approximately constant. Such ‘flat rotation curves’ are generally attributed to invisible, dark matter surrounding galaxies and providing additional gravitational attraction. 

Now a team led by Case Western Reserve University researchers has found a significant new relationship in spiral and irregular galaxies: the acceleration observed in rotation curves tightly correlates with the gravitational acceleration expected from the visible mass only.

“If you measure the distribution of star light, you know the rotation curve, and vice versa,” said Stacy McGaugh, chair of the Department of Astronomy at Case Western Reserve and lead author of the research.

The finding is consistent among 153 spiral and irregular galaxies, ranging from giant to dwarf, those with massive central bulges or none at all. It is also consistent among those galaxies comprised of mostly stars or mostly gas.

In a paper accepted for publication by the journal Physical Review Letters and posted on the preprint website arXiv, McGaugh and co-authors Federico Lelli, an astronomy postdoctoral scholar at Case Western Reserve, and James M. Schombert, astronomy professor at the University of Oregon, argue that the relation they’ve found is tantamount to a new natural law.

Read more here: http://www.newswise.com/articles/in-rotating-galaxies-distribution-of-normal-matter-precisely-determines-gravitational-acceleration

Page last modified: October 5, 2016