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Newsletters

Newsletters are a great way for departments and centers to stay connected to alumni and friends. There are three basic options we can help with:

1) Text-based email newsletter
This format may include full articles and/or link to longer articles posted on the department’s website.
Example:


  • Pros:
    • Inexpensive. You do not have to spend money on design, printing and mailing costs.
    • Environmentally-friendly – no paper waste!
    • Drives traffic to your website
    • Saves you time. You don’t have to create a lot of new content. You can recycle and draw more attention to content already featured on your website, or elsewhere online. 
    • Accessible in multiple formats. Readers can read the newsletter on a mobile device or a computer.
  • Cons:
    • Requires the email recipient to click on links to access full articles
    • May limit audience. This method reaches alumni/donors with email addresses recorded in the university database.


2) Photo-based email newsletter linking to articles on website
This email newsletter format includes photos and images, with links to articles on the department’s website
Example:

  • Pros:
    • Inexpensive. You do not have to spend money on design, printing and mailing costs.
    • Environmentally-friendly – no paper waste!
    • Drives traffic to your website
    • Saves you time. You don’t have to create a lot of new content. You can recycle and draw more attention to content already featured on your website, or elsewhere online. 
    • Easily visible on mobile devices or a computer.
  • Cons:
    • Requires the email recipient to click on links to access full articles
    • May limit audience. This method reaches alumni/donors with email addresses recorded in the university database.


3) Print newsletter
This classic format is a printed newsletter that is mailed to recipients. The designed piece can be saved as a PDF and posted online.
Example: Chemistry Newsletter 

  • Pros:
    • Some recipients may prefer receiving printed mail over getting email correspondence.
  • Cons:
    • Cost. Especially for small departments, the cost to print and mail publications may be too high.
    • Graphic design expertise and desktop publishing software is needed if you do not have a professional graphic designer available. We use Adobe Creative Suite and have an InDesign template available if you have faculty or staff with InDesign knowledge.
    • Time-consuming production. Publications must adhere to university branding guidelines.
    • Shelf life. Content can become outdated before it even goes to print. If there are errors, they cannot be corrected.
    • Accessibility. Print newsletters are not easy to read on mobile devices if made into a PDF.
Page last modified: December 11, 2017