CWRU Students Explode onto the National Mall

Thirty students from Case Western Reserve University and eight Design Lab Early College High School students participated in the inaugural USA Science & Engineering Festival Oct. 23-24. More than 1,500 exhibitors and 500,000 visitors were part of the celebration on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., which featured hands-on science, technology displays, live presentations and performances by the likes of Bill Nye The Science Guy.

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More than Meets the Eye in Art Masterpieces

What you see on the surface of a great work of art is just a small part of the painting’s history. “Each painting is its own mystery and is a laminate of layers,” says Edward Olszewski, chair of the Department of Art History and Art at Case Western Reserve University. Olszewski acts almost as a detective, peeling back the layers of a masterpiece’s history. He uses technologies, such as X-rays and infrared reflectance spectroscopy, to reveal more than eyes alone can see.

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How We Expect the Unexpected

To regain balance from an unexpected slip on the ice can require an abundance of rapid movement, but conscious thought isn’t part of the equation. Or when eating or talking over dinner, no one thinks about altering his breathing even if the food is hotter than expected. Life is full of unexpected interruptions to rhythmic behaviors that require the flexibility to make subtle to dramatic adjustments, says Hillel Chiel, professor of biology at Case Western Reserve University. And we just do them.

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Peace and War Leaders Meet for CWRU’s Inamori Summit, Oct. 25-30

Not all soldiers can leave the battlefields behind, and when back home, some relive horrific memories through bouts of post traumatic stress syndrome. Ed Tick, PhD, the author of War and the Soul, will discuss his advocacy campaign to have this mental illness recognized as a diagnosis during his keynote address for the Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence’s International Peace and War Summit, Oct. 25-30.

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Pulitzer Prize winning journalist becomes Wormser Journalism Professor

In newsrooms, obituary writing often falls to the cub reporter or the veteran approaching retirement. At the Colorado weekly newspaper Boulder Planet, the assignment landed on the desk of relative newbie Jim Sheeler. “This assignment came with an intense responsibility,” he said, because often an obituary is the last time a person’s story is told. Telling stories of “ordinary people with extraordinary lives” eventually earned Sheeler the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing for his 24-page piece, “Final Salute,” which honored fallen soldiers from the Iraq War.

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Fly fishing casts spell on literature buffs

Man met nature last week as fly-fishing lines and rods whipped through the air at the Cleveland Museum of Art’s lagoon and bluegills nipped at the lines. For 15 students in Case Western Reserve University English professor John Orlock’s SAGES seminar–Fly Fishing: The Sport, the Metaphysics, & the Literature–it was the moment to connect with nature. Lining the pathway along the lagoon, the first-year students got some step-by-step instructions from a master of the sport, George Vosmik.

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